July 25, 2014

Incinerate — Sonic Youth

yagotamullet:

Hard to believe this record came out in 2006… seems like not too long ago I was seeing Sonic Youth rip through this catalog of tunes as well as some of the incredible Daydream Nation songs in Marfa, TX for their free show at the Chinati Foundation.

As Thurston Moore said of that show, “It was “Guitarded”. They’ve since gone on an indefinite hiatus since Thurston and Kim split… so listening to this record is the only thing to really tide us all over if you’re craving some Sonic Youth Rock n Roll. 

Happy Birthday Thurston Moore!!

(I find it a lot harder to believe Daydream Nation came out in 1988!!)

8:10am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZoaKpx1MSe3FA
  
Filed under: music Sonic Youth 
July 25, 2014
joeyx:

On this day, July 25th, in 1958: Thurston Moore was born in Florida but raised in Bethel, CT, next door to my sister’s house.
Today’s soundtrack: Sonic Youth, early Branca, and Chelsea Light Moving.
Today’s musical instrument: a heavily modified Jazzmaster with a drum stick jammed into the strings.
Today’s graffiti: “Sonic Youth is neither”
Today’s quote: “Kids think of us as being totally over the hill.”
Today’s tattoo: http://tinyurl.com/lxtaqga

joeyx:

On this day, July 25th, in 1958: Thurston Moore was born in Florida but raised in Bethel, CT, next door to my sister’s house.

Today’s soundtrack: Sonic Youth, early Branca, and Chelsea Light Moving.

Today’s musical instrument: a heavily modified Jazzmaster with a drum stick jammed into the strings.

Today’s graffiti: “Sonic Youth is neither”

Today’s quote: “Kids think of us as being totally over the hill.”

Today’s tattoo: http://tinyurl.com/lxtaqga

July 25, 2014
About The High Window (1942)

theblackestofsuns:

Finished it this morning. The detective or mystery plots of Chandler's novels (distinct from their other workings) are so complicated and overdone that I find myself forgetting to care why, where or to whom something happened. Contrast this with Marlowe's often very serious attention to the details of a case and there's this weird disconnect for me as a reader. Yes, yes, he's the hired gun with the heart of gold. I get that, but I also get lost in all the things I'm supposed to remember to care about.

But that’s not all for The High Window. Chandler inhabits his settings. You are there in Los Angeles, in the early years of the Second World War. He is in neighborhood high and low, downtown and the desert, rundown apartments and high-toned mansions. He has the ability to make you feel the effects of place. His client’s home is stifling, closed-up and suffocating. It’s metaphorical, but it’s palpable too. You feel the unpleasantness of the setting and the relief of moving air driving home afterwards.

The dialogue can seem dated at times, but Chandler's better than most writers (mystery or otherwise) at keeping the patter snappy and succinct. There's some slang that might be unclear, but it doesn't seem past as much as it seems unfamiliar. You just might not have heard it before.

Like the two novels before it (The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely) The High Window is assembled from short stories written for pulp magazines. But it’s leading to The Long Goodbye, Chandler’s most sustained attempt at a detective novel about the detective instead of the detecting. The High Window has plenty of introspection in quiet and solitary moments, and a number of scenes in which Marlowe demonstrates dedication to his principles no matter what the cost. The Long Goodbye is about Marlowe having to do all the right things (his definition of right) for his own reasons, and to be satisfied with that alone. The opening piece, in which he recalls meeting Terry Lennox and then eventually sends him off (maybe fifty pages?) is some of the best writing I’ve ever read, by Chandler or anyone else. It’s helped by an underlying tension: is there going to be a mystery to solve or what? where’s this going? It’s almost better if you read it expecting a typical detective story. Because you’ll be surprised by how much it exceeds those expectations.

There’s also a scene in The Long Goodbye (I just remembered) by a hotel pool that is perfectly composed, and might be the best introduction to both Marlowe and Chandler.

OK, I finished The Long Goodbye yesterday, so couple thoughts.  What really strikes me about it is that while it’s really long (379 pages in paper), it’s very well-paced.  I’m reading the beautiful Everyman’s Library edition (got it from the library) so had read The Little Sister just previously, and TLS despite being much shorter was actually kind of hard to follow plot-wise, whereas TLG had fewer characters and a fairly linear plot.  (Which Marlowe helpfully but not intrusively recaps for us the reader several times.)

(More to come, including some awesome quotes!!)

(Wade/ Lennox/ Marlowe - Loring quotes/ chauffeur Eliot/ Potter rant)

July 25, 2014

canadianbeerandpostmodernism:

Happy 63rd to Lynda Carter!

(via thehappysorceress)

July 25, 2014

Happy Birthday Lynda Carter (July 24, 1951)

"Wonder Woman really is a phenomenon unto herself, the show and the character really has a life of its own. She represented, uh, hope, I think, for young women, and she also represented for young men, mind you, which I get a lot of mail on, the type of, like the perfect woman, one that could be beautiful and smart and fun and strong."

Thanks, vintagegal, this is really wonderful.

(via vintagegal)

July 24, 2014
30 Day Comedy Challenge
Day 18 - The most overrated comedy act
Louis C.K.
I really like Louis’s show, but when people say he’s the best standup going, I’m just like, “huh?” 

30 Day Comedy Challenge

Day 18 - The most overrated comedy act

Louis C.K.

I really like Louis’s show, but when people say he’s the best standup going, I’m just like, “huh?” 

(Source: megulapadfoot)

July 24, 2014
michellemybellethebeatles:

Blondie

michellemybellethebeatles:

Blondie

(via banglesandgogos)

July 24, 2014
alexsegura:

The Big Sleep, 1946 h/t @ruckawriter

alexsegura:

The Big Sleep, 1946 h/t @ruckawriter

(Source: bellecs)

July 24, 2014
Velvet #6 (July 2014)

theblackestofsuns:

Velvet #6 (July 2014)

I think I’m starting to figure out just what’s so compelling about the visuals in Velvet (I figured out what’s so compelling about the story right after I first heard about the series). Seeing something that seems fresh and new has a lot to do with color combinations. That is, seeing one color next to another color.

image

This is the first panel of issue 6, and the throwback of the location and date (while pretty typical for a spy story) are one thing, but look at the mist to the right of the car, the yellow of the three (foreground) light sources and the blues of the sky above the car. This is one busy panel. We’re in foreign territory, unsafe territory, and the frame is filled with elements that might almost be set in deep space.

image

A similar effect is at work here on page six, but for different reasons. It’s seventeen years later, London instead of Prague, and it’s still raining. The skyline is filled with little lights and rich violets and reds. Time and space have passed and it’s still foreign territory, because now Velvet’s unsafe at home as well. Her disguised face intrudes into the upper panel, insisting on her new identity in a world made unfamiliar by betrayal.

image

image

I include these two simply because they’re gorgeous. The top one is just a landscape as the story moves from the airport into the city, all action aimed at the horizon but with streaks of color and rows of lights painting sets of converging lines. The lower one is, what, a window into a more exotic world? Velvet herself is drawn and colored pretty simply and that contrasts with the masked woman from another reality. She’s unfamiliar as well, linked through the assemblage of color to other parts of the once comfortable city.

image

And speaking of contrasts, there’s this shot of London from above. Warm and bright, known now, and knowable. This might reflect Velvet’s plan and the security, the sureness that she derives from it. Not from certainty that it will succeed, but from resolve that it is her only course. The light from this panel shines in many of the ones that follow up through the final image of Velvet threatening her old boss with a smoking pistol.

Ed Brubaker opens this issue’s letters page by asking “didn’t Steve and Bettie just do a fantastic job?” Absolutely.

Does this mean I have to quit tradewaitin’?  Shit.  The first trade was one of my favorite things this side of “Lazarus”, which I am reading issue by agonizingly long-awaited issue.

July 24, 2014
New Batfleck Photo Brings All the Fanboys to the Yard

multiversitycomics:

image

by David Harper

Clay Enos, a professional photographer apparently working to some capacity on “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice”, just tweeted a photo with the power of a million burning suns, or at least the chin with one. The photo, which depicts a close-up of Ben Affleck in costume and looking quite moody, is a nice, close look at what we can expect from Affleck’s fit into at least the cowl, and will assuredly bring out all of the chin jokes humanity can possibly muster because, let’s be honest, that is a hell of a thing. While you’re making chin jokes, though, don’t miss the really fantastic looking short ears, though. It’s a stylistic choice that I have to say I am really behind.

Read more

Happy belated Batman day!!  I’m a pretty major Batfan, but I really don’t much care for the live action films (‘cept ‘66, natch).  That said, this looks great. 

9:33pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZoaKpx1MQIOrW
  
Filed under: batman ben affleck