July 25, 2014
About The High Window (1942)

theblackestofsuns:

Finished it this morning. The detective or mystery plots of Chandler's novels (distinct from their other workings) are so complicated and overdone that I find myself forgetting to care why, where or to whom something happened. Contrast this with Marlowe's often very serious attention to the details of a case and there's this weird disconnect for me as a reader. Yes, yes, he's the hired gun with the heart of gold. I get that, but I also get lost in all the things I'm supposed to remember to care about.

But that’s not all for The High Window. Chandler inhabits his settings. You are there in Los Angeles, in the early years of the Second World War. He is in neighborhood high and low, downtown and the desert, rundown apartments and high-toned mansions. He has the ability to make you feel the effects of place. His client’s home is stifling, closed-up and suffocating. It’s metaphorical, but it’s palpable too. You feel the unpleasantness of the setting and the relief of moving air driving home afterwards.

The dialogue can seem dated at times, but Chandler's better than most writers (mystery or otherwise) at keeping the patter snappy and succinct. There's some slang that might be unclear, but it doesn't seem past as much as it seems unfamiliar. You just might not have heard it before.

Like the two novels before it (The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely) The High Window is assembled from short stories written for pulp magazines. But it’s leading to The Long Goodbye, Chandler’s most sustained attempt at a detective novel about the detective instead of the detecting. The High Window has plenty of introspection in quiet and solitary moments, and a number of scenes in which Marlowe demonstrates dedication to his principles no matter what the cost. The Long Goodbye is about Marlowe having to do all the right things (his definition of right) for his own reasons, and to be satisfied with that alone. The opening piece, in which he recalls meeting Terry Lennox and then eventually sends him off (maybe fifty pages?) is some of the best writing I’ve ever read, by Chandler or anyone else. It’s helped by an underlying tension: is there going to be a mystery to solve or what? where’s this going? It’s almost better if you read it expecting a typical detective story. Because you’ll be surprised by how much it exceeds those expectations.

There’s also a scene in The Long Goodbye (I just remembered) by a hotel pool that is perfectly composed, and might be the best introduction to both Marlowe and Chandler.

OK, I finished The Long Goodbye yesterday, so couple thoughts.  What really strikes me about it is that while it’s really long (379 pages in paper), it’s very well-paced.  I’m reading the beautiful Everyman’s Library edition (got it from the library) so had read The Little Sister just previously, and TLS despite being much shorter was actually kind of hard to follow plot-wise, whereas TLG had fewer characters and a fairly linear plot.  (Which Marlowe helpfully but not intrusively recaps for us the reader several times.)

(More to come, including some awesome quotes!!)

(Wade/ Lennox/ Marlowe - Loring quotes/ chauffeur Eliot/ Potter rant)

July 15, 2014
fellowfrockery:

Another in the exciting series of “Armed Librarians”. A demurely Tarantinoesque State Library of Victoria staff member holds Ned Kelly’s pistols, probably in the early 1960s. Check out those fingernails! Taken by an Argus newspaper photographer.

fellowfrockery:

Another in the exciting series of “Armed Librarians”. A demurely Tarantinoesque State Library of Victoria staff member holds Ned Kelly’s pistols, probably in the early 1960s. Check out those fingernails! Taken by an Argus newspaper photographer.

(via creepingirrelevance)

July 3, 2014
vintagecrimeblacklizard:

"On the afternoon it rained frogs, sun perch, and minnows, Sunset discovered she could take a beating good as Three-Fingered Jack. Unlike Jack, who had taken his in the sunshine, she took hers in her own home at the tail end of a cyclone, the windows rattling, the roof lifting, the hardwood floor cold as stone." —from Sunset and Sawdust by Joe Lansdale In the middle of a cyclone, beautiful, red-haired Sunset Jones shoots her husband Pete dead when he tries to beat and rape her. To Camp Rapture’s general consternation, Sunset’s mother-in-law arranges for her to take over from Pete as town constable. As if that weren’t hard enough to swallow in depression era east Texas, Sunset actually takes the job seriously, and her investigation into a brutal double murder pulls her into a maelstrom of greed, corruption, and unspeakable malice. It is a case that will require a well of inner strength she never knew she had. Spirited and electrifying, Sunset and Sawdust is a mystery and a tale like nothing you’ve read before. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/yeNhg

vintagecrimeblacklizard:

"On the afternoon it rained frogs, sun perch, and minnows, Sunset discovered she could take a beating good as Three-Fingered Jack. Unlike Jack, who had taken his in the sunshine, she took hers in her own home at the tail end of a cyclone, the windows rattling, the roof lifting, the hardwood floor cold as stone."
—from Sunset and Sawdust by Joe Lansdale

In the middle of a cyclone, beautiful, red-haired Sunset Jones shoots her husband Pete dead when he tries to beat and rape her. To Camp Rapture’s general consternation, Sunset’s mother-in-law arranges for her to take over from Pete as town constable. As if that weren’t hard enough to swallow in depression era east Texas, Sunset actually takes the job seriously, and her investigation into a brutal double murder pulls her into a maelstrom of greed, corruption, and unspeakable malice. It is a case that will require a well of inner strength she never knew she had. Spirited and electrifying, Sunset and Sawdust is a mystery and a tale like nothing you’ve read before. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/yeNhg

June 23, 2014

winkbooks:

Stencil Republic – Beyond Banksy: The international allure of stencil art

Stencil Republic
by Oliver Walker and Margherita Dessanay
Laurence King Publishing
2012, 90 pages, 9.7 x 9.8 x 0.6 inches (paperback)
$21 Buy a copy on Amazon

You could rip out any of the 20 laser-cut, brown-paper stencils that are bound on perforated pages from this follow-up of The Stencil Street Art Book, and then take to the streets of your hometown armed with a can of spray paint, but then you’d just have another pretty picture book about art. Not that said pictures and their accompanying words don’t matter: Margherita Dessanay’s thumbnail sketches of international street artists such as Bs.as.stncl (Buenos Aires), Chris Stain (Baltimore), Dan Innes (Brighton), Ozi, (Sao Paulo), and Sten Lex (Rome) are as spontaneous and impactful as graffiti itself, and the slightly longer interview with self-described “human printer” Hugo Kaagman (aka Stencil King) will make you want to visit Amsterdam for more than just the weed. – Ben Marks

June 23, 2014

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Filed under: books art 
June 15, 2014

poison303:

There’s probably some words in there too. It’s just by LESTER BANGS.

I saw this a couple weeks ago and it inspired me to check Alibris, and I got it for like TEN BUCKS (CHEAP!!).  I can attest the words are good, though there are not a hell of a lot of ‘em, and Bangs was kinda ambivalent about Blondie’s success.  And probably pretty high when he wrote it.

(via siouxsieramone)

June 13, 2014
"My idea of rich is that you can buy every book you ever want without looking at the price and you’re never around assholes. That’s the two things to really fight for in life."

— John Waters  (via detailsdetales)

(Source: marion--crane, via arcanelibrarian)

June 12, 2014
"When you make a weird choice, you’re drawing a line with the reader, and when you get the reader across that line, you have them forever — or for the book at least. Because you’re asking them to think about or ponder or feel something they didn’t think they were going to have to feel. It’s the theme of all the books I loved as a kid, and it’s still how I value [a] story. Though it isn’t the content that has to be weird, sometimes it’s the sentence structure or language."

A Q&A with Noir Author Megan Abbott | Book Reviews | Memphis News and Events | Memphis Flyer (via alexsegura)

(via dirtyriver)

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Filed under: books megan abbott 
June 2, 2014
vintagecrimeblacklizard:

 “I’m an occasional drinker, the kind of guy who goes out for a beer and wakes up in Singapore with a full beard.” 
—from THE SIMPLE ART OF MURDER

vintagecrimeblacklizard:

 “I’m an occasional drinker, the kind of guy who goes out for a beer and wakes up in Singapore with a full beard.” 

—from THE SIMPLE ART OF MURDER

(via filmnoirandfemmefatales)

May 3, 2014
vintagechampagnefever:

The incomparable Buster Keaton 

vintagechampagnefever:

The incomparable Buster Keaton 

(via wehadfacesthen)

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Filed under: Buster Keaton books 
May 2, 2014
nprbooks:

ala-con:

ebookfriendly:

Book conqueror:-) http://ebks.to/1cRZU1j

ALL the books!

Yeah, he’s got nothing on my own Corporal Flops (yes, my cat Flops has a military rank; it’s a long story).

nprbooks:

ala-con:

ebookfriendly:

Book conqueror:-) http://ebks.to/1cRZU1j

ALL the books!

Yeah, he’s got nothing on my own Corporal Flops (yes, my cat Flops has a military rank; it’s a long story).

(via nprbooks)

4:21pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZoaKpx1ElNfMZ
  
Filed under: cats manga books